IoT Design Considerations: User Interface

Today’s consumers and business owners expect to access and control the world around them. How are your buyers going to interface with your product? Options range from using a smart home panel or gateway to an on-product display that can be paired with LEDs or push buttons. In addition, apps that monitor and control connected devices can be available for on-the-go consumers with smart phones. The type of product and its possible use-cases are important considerations when designing a product that can communicate information to its user.

Wi-Fi-enabled IoT devices have the ability to act as a soft access point (soft AP) which allows a user to “join” its network locally with a smartphone, laptop or tablet. Soft APs make product LED/LCD displays unnecessary since the screen of the connected device will serve the same purpose.

Using a soft AP does not preclude the module from connecting to the Internet and cloud-based services. This dual-mode is very attractive because the user can access the product remotely and locally, depending on the features of the product.

To download the complete Internet of Things Design Considerations White Paper, click here.

You’ll be able to turn GE’s new LEDs on and off with Siri

Apple’s take on home automation, HomeKit, understandably generated a lot of buzz when it was unveiled last year at last year’s WWDC. HomeKit promises to be an integrated, easy-to-manage solution for iOS users with networked devices — but the wait for approved products has been unexpectedly long. The delay was apparently thanks to a thorough certification process, but it seems the first wave of approved hardware is finally beginning to emerge. In early May, GE took the wraps off new color-changing LED smart bulbs compatible with HomeKit.

Apple’s managed to rally an impressive number of companies behind HomeKit — ConnectSense and Schlage come to mind.

Read more at Digital Trends.